Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘winter’


15874630_1364520593593229_6598519873482724859_o

 

I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape – the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter.  Something waits beneath it, the whole story doesn’t show.  –  Andrew Wyeth

 

15873567_1362535737125048_3388353581764250745_n

 

What is life? It is a flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset. ~Crowfoot
16251808_1381866525191969_7852776813754760126_o
If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome. ~ Anne Bradstreet
15542027_1352332668145355_4333988268620832746_n
I am a book of snow,
a spacious hand, an open meadow,
a circle that waits,
I belong to the earth and its winter. ~
Pablo Neruda
15965960_1368320726546549_3737798365480885339_n

Read Full Post »


Winter is here and you need to be prepared for any emergency.  The recent blizzard that hit the Midwest shut down roads, collapsed buildings, stranded motorists for over 24 hours and killed 14 people.  Being prepared at home is one thing, but being caught outdoors is a totally different scenario.  Putting together an emergency bag and keeping it in your vehicle is essential if you are to survive a cold weather emergency.

Here is a list of items that you can put together your own emergency kit.

Typical Bug out Bag

  • Enough food and water to last for seventy two hours. This includes:
    • 4 litres (1 gallon) of water per person per day, for drinking and cooking.
    • Non-perishable food.
    • water purification supplies.
    • Cooking supplies.
    • Cutlery and cups/dishes.
  • A first aid kit.
  • Fire starting tool
  • A disaster plan including location of emergency centers, rallying points, possible evacuation routes etc.
  • Professional emergency literature explaining what to do in various types of disaster, studied and understood before the actual disaster but kept for reference.
  • Maps and travel information.
  • Standard camping equipment, including sanitation supplies.
  • Weather appropriate clothing (poncho, headwear, gloves, etc.)
  • Bedding items such as sleeping bags & blankets.
  • Enough medicine to last an extended evacuation period.
  • Pet, child and elderly care needs.
  • Battery or crank operated Radio.
  • Lighting (battery or crank operated flashlight, glow sticks)
  • Firearm(s) and appropriate ammunition, depending on local laws.
  • Crowbar (weapon, building and vehicle entry, etc.)
  • Cash and change, as electronic banking transactions may not be available during the initial period following an emergency or evacuation.
  • Fixed-blade or folding knife.

What would you do?

More reading on surviving emergencies.

Read Full Post »


The past several weeks has shown us that winter weather is dangerous.  During these major storms, many people became snow bound, and several people died due to bad decisions and not being prepared.  Making a bad decision is human, but not being prepared for an emergency is unwise and unnecessary.  Having spent time in the Arctic, where my primary function was to drive in all sorts of inclement weather, I can attest to the fact that “being prepared” will save your life.  Making or purchasing an emergency kit for your vehicle is simple, inexpensive, and can save your life.  To make your own emergency kit, you need the basic items and knowledge.

1.  Always check the weather before you leave and tell someone where you are going.

2.  Always keep your gas tank full when driving in cold weather.

3.  Stay in your vehicle and allow for refresh air.

4.  Do not eat snow for hydration.  Eating snow lowers the body temperature.  Let the snow melt first.

5.  Carry a winter survival kit in your car to include:

blankets, flashlight, extra batteries, brightly colored cloth, sand or a bag of cat litter, shovel, candles and matches, non perishable high calorie foods, (nuts, raisins, and candy bars), newspapers (for insulation), a first aid kit and jumper cables, small, sharp knife, large plastic garbage bag, cell phone adapter to plug into lighter, shovel, tow cables or chain, sleeping bag or blankets, road flares and reflectors.

This kit is simple to make and could save you life.

Beautiful but deadly...

For information and resources on emergency preparedness, check out:

Ryeder…survival quarterly

Read Full Post »